market.png
 

Fair Market. is a 5,000 square-foot raw storefront space that will feature artists’ billboards, posters, apparel and more with a focus on gender inequality, marketing tactics, commerce, labor, work, and fair wage.

 
 
 

Notable inclusions are Guerrilla Girls, who will be exhibiting for the first time in Miami with a selection of four monumental billboards that include new and historic works; Pia Camil’s Bara Bara Bara approximates the makeshift tented markets of Latin American urban landscapes and will occupy the heart of the ‘market’; Cheryl Pope will show A Silent I, a suite of championship banners which include “I” statements written by students who partook in workshops with the artist; Ruby Rumie whose monumental wall of portraits Lugar Común positions the relationship between women across class-divides in Colombia; Miami–based artist Juana Valdes will install Hanging By and a collection of her ceramic ‘colored china rags’; Jillian Mayer will show her iconic Impressions billboard that highlights the way that we (and women in particular) are marketed and sold to; Liza Cowan’s famed image of Alix Dobkin wearing the original The Future is Female t-shirt will greet viewers as they enter the market; Gallery Tally, a project by Micol Hebron, artist and curator who has crowd-sourced 500 poster designs from around the world that highlight the ratio of male to female artists in contemporary art galleries; Jessy Nite’s Remember Me  is an ephemeral message, the very existence of which depends entirely upon the passage of light and shadow; and Taja Lindley’s This Ain’t A Eulogy: A Ritual for Re-Membering appropriates standard issue black plastic garbage bags that at once harken to our concepts of reuse, disuse and labor but at once stand in for the black lives that have been taken too soon and Reed van Brunschot’s Thank You for Shopping, that features oversized plastic bags that are surreal in their correlation to the viewer meant to spark a dialogue between the symbolism of our quotidian lives and the absurd objects that surround us making our outsized relationship with consumerism and capital evident.


Fair Apparel.

Fair Apparel. is a special sector within Market that includes t-shirts design by women artists and designers that respond to this particular socio-political moment. The t-shirts are included as works of art in and of themselves or as artifacts of social and art historical movements that deepen our understanding of feminism and contemporary creative art movements.

Artists included are Otherwild x Herstory with The Future is Female t-shirt, Zoila Darton-WORD agency with Creator shirt, Bella Doña, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Guerrilla Girls and Kembra Pfahler.

Pia Camil (Mexico)

Pia Camil lives and works in Mexico City. Her work is usually associated with the Mexican urban landscape, the aesthetic language of modernism and its relationship to retail and advertising. Recently she has engaged in public participation as a way to activate the work and engage with the politics of consumerism. Her work Bara Bara Bara approximates the makeshift tented markets of Latin American urban landscapes and will occupy the heart of Fair Market. in an entirely new configuration from its previous iterations. The work is created by sewing together hundred of used t-shirts that have made their ways back and forth across the US/ Mexico border—arriving for sale in Las Torres market in Iztapalapa, a neighborhood of Mexico City, to be bought and integrated into this artwork which has now traveled over much of the United States. The apparel utilized in this work reminds of the way that text-based messaging and slogans transmit ideas across borders to become absorbed within cultural manifestations.

Liza Cowan (USA)

Liza Cowan has been a working artist for over 40 years. Cowan’s career began with designing buttons and greeting cards for her company White Mare, Inc, then as the editor/designer for the magazines Cowrie, Lesbian Feminist and Dyke, A Quarterly, both in the 1970’s. Much of her work explores the fragile line between fine art and pop culture, and often explores notions of time, either as time-travel in My Amazons series, or the effects of time on human-made objects, as in the Shipyard series. Fair Market. will feature her famed image of Alix Dobkin wearing the original “The Future is Female” t-shirt which will greet viewers.

Guerrilla Girls (USA)

The Guerrilla Girls are feminist activist artists. Their anonymity keeps the focus on the issues, and away from who they might be. They wear gorilla masks in public and use facts, humor and outrageous visuals to expose gender and ethnic bias as well as corruption in politics, art, film, and pop culture. The Guerrilla Girls will present their work for the first time in Miami with a series of monumental billboards of both contemporary and historic works. Confronting all visitors who enter Market with the historic Do Women Have to Be Naked to Get into the Met Museum billboard and equally historic Two Thirds poster, the Guerrilla Girls set the tone for the market place. Two Thirds is a historic work from 1985 when the statistics regarding the pay gap were dire and the poster launched a new conversation that continues to this day as pertains to fair pay.

Micol Hebron (USA)

Micol Hebron is an interdisciplinary feminist artist whose practice includes studio work, curating, writing, social media, crowd-sourcing, teaching, public-speaking, and both individual and collaborative projects. She has been living and working in Los Angeles since 1992. Hebron is the founder/director of The Situation Room resource space for the creative community; and the Digital Pasty/Gender Equity initiative for the internet. Fair Market. will feature Gallery Tally, a crowd-sourced, social engagement art project in which 2000+ artists from around the world have joined the effort to collect and visualize statistical data regarding ratios of male and female artists in top contemporary art galleries. Artists were invited to make one posters for each gallery, in whatever style or medium they chose. It is a response and alternative to the hegemonic, hierarchical, patriarchal, heteronormative ‘standard’ that has unjustly dominated the art world for far too long.

Taja Lindley (USA)

Taja Lindley is a healer, artist, and activist based in Brooklyn, NY, creating socially engaged artwork that reflects and transforms audiences, shifts culture, and moves people to action. Her installation, This Ain’t A Eulogy: A Ritual for Re-Membering appropriates standard issue black plastic garbage bags that at once harken to our concepts of reuse, disuse and labor but at once stand in for the black lives that have been taken too soon—her undulating work creating a wall of ancestral memory, that identifies the work of telling stories and maintaining memory as she repaints messages from the past back into existence. Moved by the non-indictments of the police officers responsible for the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown, the installation draws parallels between discarded materials and the violent treatment of Black people in the United States.

Jillian Mayer (USA)

Jillian Mayer is a Miami-based artist and filmmaker that explores how technology affects our identities, lives and experiences. Through videos, online experiences, photography, telephone numbers, performance, sculpture, painting and installation, her projects investigate the tension between physical and digital iterations of identity and existence. Mayer’s iconic Impressions billboard highlights the way that we (and women in particular) are marketed and sold to while approximating these same marketing tactics.

Jessy Nite (USA)

Jessy Nite is a contemporary Miami-based artist who generally creates site-specific, interactive works in public spaces. Her signature use of color and custom-made typography cross a variety of disciplines, carrying a playful but deeply rooted narrative. Nite’s Remember Me is a fleeting message, the very existence of which depends entirely upon the passage of light and shadow, reminding the viewer of our own evanescent presence and the passing on of our messages and experiences to others.

Cheryl Pope (USA)

Cheryl Pope is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary visual artist focused on confronting the politics of identity as it relates to the individual and the community. Pope believes listening to be the most political act and is the foundation of her practice. Pope’s work A Silent I, a suite of championship banners which include “I” statements written by students who partook in workshops with the artist, will be reconfigured in a site-sensitive format for Fair.

Ruby Rumié (Colombia)

Ruby Rumié’s work includes painting, sculpture, photography, video and installation. She develops projects based on injustice and psychology, and the impact of modern life in the daily lives of common people. Rumié often works with the locals of Getsemaní, a historical neighborhood of Cartagena de Indias, where she lives and has focused her work on the impact of gentrification and progress. Her monumental wall of portraits Lugar Común positions the relationship between women across class-divides in Colombia by stripping the sitters of jewelry and fashion which might otherwise announce socio-economic status. These portraits serve as a way of visibilizing the often unacknowledged intimate relationships and connections between women who clean, work and live in the same household.

Juana Valdes (Cuba / USA)

Juana Valdes’ artwork is grounded in a multi-disciplinary practice that combines the process of photography, sculpture, performance, ceramic, and printmaking. Her artistic practice has focused on recollecting her own personal experience and traces, recalls, and record her personal experiences of migration as an Afro Cuban-American. She explores experiences of transculturation directly and poetically, recreating mementos and memories that share imagery of both displacement and remembrance. Hanging By is a collection of text-based ceramic tiles that break down a poetic phrase so that each tile presents the viewer with a new message. A collection of her ceramic ‘colored china rags’ approximate household rags but are made from Bone China—distinguished from all other porcelain for its whiteness and translucency. In altering the clay “body” through inserting pigment directly into the clay, Valdes questions skin color, tones, aging, and gender bias. Her work also serves as a way of highlighting and creating the beauty within the object and artifact of labor.

Reed Van Brunshot (Perú)

Reed van Brunschot is a Peruvian/Dutch American Visual Artist, working with mixed media, sculpture, performance, installations, paintings, and video. Her Thank You for Shopping oversized plastic bags are unexpected and surreal in their correlation to the viewer. They spark a dialogue between the symbolism of our quotidian lives and the absurd objects and artifacts that surround us and make evident our outsized relationship with consumerism and capital.